1. 16 April 2014

    26 notes

    Reblogged from
    gowns

    Anonymous asked: How do you deal with misogyny and homophobia? Misogyny especially.

    gowns:

    i don’t. i can’t. one simply can’t !

    so look beyond the one!

    read a lot of books by women + queer ppl, including but not limited to theory. watch a lot of movies made by women + queer ppl, and with your viewings, include (but don’t limit) your lenses informed by theory. seek out all kinds of art made by women + queer ppl, and connect it to everything else.

    then go to sleep

    and when you wake up seek out more women + queer ppl

    i guess my answer is, art and community, respectively / intertwined, offer the only “solutions” that i can see. [note; there are no solutions.] i also suggest sleeping, because that is my go-to bandaid for everything.

  2. There are all kinds of silences and each of them means a different thing. There is the silence that comes with morning in a forest, and this is different from the silence of a sleeping city. There is the silence after a rainstorm, and before a rainstorm, and these are not the same. There is the silence of emptiness, the silence of fear, the silence of doubt. There is a certain silence that can emanate from a lifeless object as from a chair lately used, or from a piano with old dust upon its keys, or from anything that has answered to the need of a man, for pleasure or for work. This kind of silence can speak. Its voice may be melancholy, but it is not always so; for the chair may have been left by a laughing child or the last notes of the piano may have been raucous and gay. Whatever the mood or the circumstance, the essence of its quality may linger in the silence that follows. It is a soundless echo.

    — Beryl Markham, West With the Night (via wordless-stanza)

    (Source: under-the-volcano)

  3. cross-connect:

    Caryn Drexl born 1980, is a self-taught conceptual and portrait photographer based in north/central Florida, USA. She has a unique approach to taking female portraits. Her style is like the photographic version of Edgar Allan Poe, with its imaginative details and vague sense of discomfort. She openly admits that “Everything I know I learned through trial and error or the internet.” Although she loves the look of film, and does own some vintage cameras, for practicality she prefers working with digital images. And no big cameras either, “I have girly little hands and a dislike for big heavy cameras that’ll break my wrist or my neck, so the littler ones suit me well.”

    You can find more of Caryn’s mysteries in her Etsy shop, CarynDrexl.

    Tumblr I Facebook  I Twitter I 500px I Google+ I deviantART

  4. explore-blog:

For Vincent van Gogh's birthday, a rare look at his creative process in his never-before-revealed sketchbooks – a bittersweet record of his artistic genius and unlived dreams.

    explore-blog:

    For Vincent van Gogh's birthday, a rare look at his creative process in his never-before-revealed sketchbooks – a bittersweet record of his artistic genius and unlived dreams.

  5. artmonia:

    Book Art by  Thomas Allen.

  6. mothernaturenetwork:

 Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded



If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?
It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.
In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.
“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.
What does this mean?
In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.
However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.
These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.
In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.
This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:
How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?
Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.
How can a squib be born to wizard parents?
Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.
How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?
The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.
You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

    mothernaturenetwork:

    Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

    If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

    It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

    In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

    “Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

    What does this mean?

    In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

    However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

    These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

    In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

    This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

    How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

    Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

    How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

    Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

    How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

    The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

    You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

  7. hifructosemag:

    We spoke with twin artists How and Nosm about their current show at Pace Prints in NYC. Read the interview on Hi-Fructose.

  8. Renewed shall be blade that was broken. 

    (Source: sweetsweetlisteners)

  9. medievalpoc:

Giovanni Maria Falconetto
Diana of Ephesus
Italy (c. 1530s)
Fresco; Murals in the Hall of the Zodiac, Palazzo d’Arco in Mantova.
In the early 16th century the palace belonged to Luigi Gonzaga (1500-1532). Leo,the lion: Diana of Ephesus,nursing black and white putti; two lions on her arms; background: Hercules kills the Nemean lion.
via ArtRes (Lessing Images)

    medievalpoc:

    Giovanni Maria Falconetto

    Diana of Ephesus

    Italy (c. 1530s)

    Fresco; Murals in the Hall of the Zodiac, Palazzo d’Arco in Mantova.

    In the early 16th century the palace belonged to Luigi Gonzaga (1500-1532). Leo,the lion: Diana of Ephesus,nursing black and white putti; two lions on her arms; background: Hercules kills the Nemean lion.

    via ArtRes (Lessing Images)